RHS READING CENTER!
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch

In The Last Lecture, professor Randy Pausch expands on a speech he gave at Carnegie Mellon University in September 2007. Pausch, who was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer, wrote this lecture that became a book. It primarily targets young adults and children who are hoping to attain their dreams. Sadly, Pausch passed away in 2008, not long after he gave the “last” lecture. Written with humor and intelligence, this book reflects on the main points of the lecture: the importance of good parenting, dreaming big, and how to put people before possessions. For example, pausch once picked up his nephew in his new Volkswagen Cabrio Convertible. His sister told the kids not to mess anything up and to wipe off their feet before they got in, Pausch overheard this and decided to intentionally spill a coke all over the seats to show the kids that even though the car was nice, it was still just a thing. Pausch was a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University, at the age of 47 he was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer. This, of course, shocked his family, he had three children, Logan, Chloe, Dylan and a wife, Jai. His book was actually written…

Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

Every action has a consequence. Every action, every move, and every word spoken. The book, Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher, tells a story about how a girl named Hannah Baker wanted to end her life. She didn’t fit into her new town, and she was unhappy with how people viewed her. She made 13 tapes telling each person’s story; each tape left out no detail about how she was treated by the specific person. Each person in the book acted without thinking about the consequences. Everything in this book had a snowball effect. This concept is just like high school for everyone, but Hannah had it much worse. Most times, rumors die out after a week or two, but the rumors about her lasted much longer because she was the new girl, and she was just making an impression on everyone. One kiss led into a rumor, and that rumor led into another rumor, which led to something bigger. When she would make a friend, they would turn on her, and that would be another problem. With Hannah being the new girl and with all of these negative comments playing over and over again in her head, she was…

Level Up – Gene Luen Yang

Level Up by Gene Luen Yang is the story of a teenager, Dennis Ouyang. He has always struggled in the shadow of his parents’ expectation. His father wants him to be a gastroenterologist, but that is not what Dennis wants to do. However, Dennis doesn’t want to fight with his father about the expectation, and therefore he still attends medical school to study to be a gastroenterologist. In the book, it shows the path the Dennis choses after his father passed away. He goes to medical school and studies, but that is not what Dennis likes to do. Instead, he is only doing what his father wanted him to be. It makes him depressed and unhappy. He thought that his destiny was to be gastroenterologist, but that was his father’s dream, not his. As a result, he dropped out of medical school and began playing video games because he knew what he was supposed to do in the games, unlike in life.  The games make him feel like he knows what he’s doing: the goals were clear and attainable. This book reflects the teenagers now: they are lost in the “path of life,” but they are able to find a…

Food Rules — Michael Pollan
Health , Non-Fiction , Self-Help / October 18, 2016

Food Rules, written by Michael Pollan, an American author, activist, and journalist, is a non-fiction food guide to a healthy, slim, disease-free life. The way this book is set up is different than most books that you see; in this book, there are 64 rules that all have a different fact and tip on how to change your daily-food routine for the better. This book opened my mind to the seriousness of food and diet. The rules that tended to stick to me were the ones that i could change right away. As a result, I have made some changes to my diet after reading this book, for example, I have limited eating all forms of processed sugar, I went to the grocery store with my parents to get whole wheat bread instead of white American bread, and I don’t eat as much red meat. If I were to give this book a movie rating, it would surprisingly be PG-13, for good reason. In the book, it could be slightly frightening to the reader because of all the talk of living an obese life, cancers in the GI tract, and horrible diseases that can occur from the so called “Western…